Have an Ever-Blooming Shana Tova (good year)!

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{a centerpiece featured at a Rosh Hashanah dinner}

 

Rosh Hashanah means head of the year. In Jewish tradition, it is the start of a new year. According to Leviticus 23:23-25 and Numbers 29:1-6, this holy holiday prescribed by the LORD is known as ‘Yom Teruah’ in Hebrew or ‘Feast of Trumpets’ in English. It is one of seven feasts those in covenant with Abba Father practice. Last night, I attended and participated in a Rosh Hashanah service, which included a feast, dancing, singing, and of course, many blasts of the shofar, a ram’s horn used as a trumpet in ancient Israel and today. There are many layers, depths, and prophetic implications to this ongoing, ever-blooming Feast of the LORD! To see a brief video capturing some of this special event as well as my thoughts from a Messianic perspective, click on the YouTube video below. Shana Tova!

Torah Portions: Balak / Pinchas / Mattot & Masei

Forgive me for the delay…I have been exceptionally busy these last few weeks, but here are this week’s “Torah Portion” of Mattot and Masei as well as the last two weeks (Balak & Pinchas). #torah #portion #Bible#everblooming #roses #growinginGod
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Did you know when Jesus / Yeshua read Isaiah 61 in the synagogue on Shabbat (Sabbath/Saturday), which we can read about in Luke 4:16-30), He was reading from that specific week’s “Haftarah” portion? For thousands of years, those of the Judaism faith have read from the Torah and Haftarah. A major part of the Jewish worship service since the days of escaping Babylonian captivity (see books of Ezra & Nehemiah), is the public reading of the Torah. For the Jewish people learned the hard way while under Babylonian captivity to forsake God’s instructions will inevitably lead to physical and spiritual bondage. The Torah is the first five books of the Bible, also known as the Law, or God’s instructions for life on HOW to love, HOW to live, and HOW to worship. Each week, in today’s congregations of Judaism, Messianic Judaism, and many Hebrew Roots’ congregations read a certain portion of the Torah in their services. So the whole world (of those groups) is studying the same portions in unity. However, many years ago, circa 175 BC, when Antiochus Epiphanes conquered the temple, he outlawed the public reading of the Torah, replaced the holy artifacts with pagan gods within the temple, slaughtered pig, an unclean and abomination according to Leviticus 11, Deut 14, and Isaiah 65-66, as a means to mock God’s ordained sacrificial system, and even tormented and killed Jews for holding to their belief in the one true God and their desire to adhere to His laws. All of this was an “abomination of desolation”, which will happen again according to prophecies found in the Books of Daniel, Matthew, and Revelation. Consequently, the rabbis of those days researched and prescribed related passages of the Torah found in the Prophets to be read each week instead of the Torah during that tumultuous time. This became known as “Haftarah”, which means “conclude”. After that horrific time, the practice of reading from the Prophets stuck so today, passages called portions from the Torah and the Haftarah, which are related and read. In Messianic Judaism (and possibly Hebrew Roots too), related portions from the Brit Chadesha (Renewed/New Covenant) are read as well. This photo captures this week’s. The Torah portion’s title is selected from the first few words of the passage.

Torah Portion: Korah

TorahPortion.Korach.EBRWhile there always is so much wisdom gleaned from the various Torah, Haftarah, and Brit Chadesha’s portions, notice in these passages the theme of rebelling against God’s prophets, a type of spiritual leadership, Korah (and others) rather desired to have power and control. Later, in the Book of Samuel, we read how the people also didn’t want a prophet to lead and judge them, rather they sought a kingly carnal type of leadership in Saul. The people of Israel crucified Moses, Aaron, and Samuel with their ongoing complaining and rebellious words. And yet, when the ultimate prophet and king, being Yeshua, The Messiah, manifested, the descendants of Israel, repeated history, feeling threatened by their desire for power and control, rejecting the voice of God through a man, and crucified ‘The King of Jews’, the ultimate king they and their ancestors had longed for!

Torah Portion: Beha’alotcha

In Messianic Judaism, Hebrew roots congregations, as well as various forms of Judaism, there is a weekly Bible reading plan that the whole world (of those groups) studies in unity. This week’s Torah portion is called “Beha’alotcha”, which means in Hebrew “Lift Up”. Can you find a theme or connection between these various passages?

TorahPortion.Behaalotcha.EBR

 

 

 

 

Torah Portion: Nasso

In Messianic Judaism, Hebrew roots congregations, as well as various forms of Judaism, there is a weekly Bible reading plan that the whole world (of those groups) studies in unity. This week’s Torah portion is called “Nasso”, which means in Hebrew “Take Up”. Can you find a theme or connection between these various passages?

TorahPortion.Nasso.EBR.jpg

[Note: Torah is the first five books of the Bible, Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy, also known as the Law. Haftarah is “partings” or portions of the prophets. The Gospels are the written recordings about the life of Yeshua / Jesus, the Messiah, found in the books of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. Messianic Judaism, as well as those in various Hebrew roots congregations, believe Yeshua or Jesus of Nazareth is the Messiah and includes the Gospels as well as the rest of the New Testament in their studies whereas Judaism does not.]

 

Torah Portion: Bamidbar

This week’s Torah portion is called “Bamidbar”, which means in Hebrew, “In The Wilderness”. Notice the theme of being in the wilderness in the following passages. How does this apply to you today? How could it apply in the future?

Torah Portion. Bamidbar.EBR

Torah Portion: Behar

This week’s Torah portion is/was Behar, which means “On The Mountain”. While on Mount Sinai, Abba (Father) shared with Moses the need to let the land rest every 7 years and the consequences for the failure to do so manifested many years later. The concept of resting every 7 days and every 7 years is prophetic of the future Messianic era when Yeshua reigns…It also reveals to us that we can rest knowing Abba will provide for us on the 7th day and in the 7th year. #torahportion #shemitah #sabbath

Torah.Behar.EBR

Torah Portion: Emor “Speak”

Emor.EBR

In Messianic Judaism, there is something called a weekly “Torah portion” which takes a passage from the first 5 books of the Bible, as well as a portion from the books scribed by prophets, and portions from the “Brit Hadasha” or “Renewed Covenant”, which in English Bibles has been translated as New Testament. As of May 18, 2019, this weeks Torah portion is the Hebrew word “Emor”, which means “Speak” or “Say”. What is our Heavenly Father speaking to us through these passages? Can you find the connections?

Blessings and Shalom!

-Carrie