Video: The Darkness

Last year, I made this recording for my radio show called “In the Garden with Carrie Renee Turner” heard over the airways on 106.1 FM in York, Pennsylvania. Recently, I collaborated my radio recordings while adding pictures of my rose photography for YouTube.

May you always be “ever-blooming”!

Video: Up Down All Around

Last year, I made this recording for my radio show called “In the Garden with Carrie Renee Turner” heard over the airways on 106.1 FM in York, Pennsylvania. Recently, I collaborated my radio recordings while adding pictures of my rose photography for YouTube.

May you always be “ever-blooming”!

The Last Pruning

As an unusually warm February day invited me to take off my jacket to embrace the glow of the sun, I found myself inspecting my wintered roses. Despite being in the hardiness zone 6b and it still being technically winter, my roses were bursting with eye buds as well as signs of eager growth. Generally speaking, it is best to wait till the forsythia begin blooming before doing any pruning – at least for this area. You never know in this wacky Pennsylvania weather when a large snow storm could strike. Last year, I had blooms and black spot in January, then over 20″ of snow dropped on just one February day.

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Spring 2016

Nevertheless, this particular warm February day, my heart warred as it wrestled with joyful signs of Spring, but also feelings of remorse. After having our home on the market a few months, we received an offer and settle in April. Although there will be much I miss about our home of 10 years, my rose garden will be sorely missed. We hope to do some traveling while settling somewhere in the South – most likely the Myrtle Beach area, which is hardiness zone 8a/b – a whole 2 zones warmer (that much I am looking forward to)! Alas, if we move there, we would purchase a condo with a balcony. Because if I have to give up my rose garden, I require at least a balcony. It wouldn’t surprise me if rose bushes mysteriously pop up around the condominium community too! 😉

While perusing my eager rose babies, I decided to clean up the garden and do some pruning. After all, they still are mine and I long to see a stunning Spring flush one last time before we have to say our goodbyes. Oh, how I hope the young lady who purchased this safe haven, this small glimpse of heaven, will come to cherish it as I have. I can’t even comprehend anyone ripping out rose bushes to settle for ordinary grass. Yet, I realize not everyone is “obsessed with roses” as my friends and family notate about me.

Upon completing my work in the garden, I dusted off the dirt that gathered around my lower limbs, discussed with my husband my accomplishments, and then cried.

 

 

Pretty in Pink

Sweet Drift, by Knock Out Roses / Star Roses and Plants, has been an excellent disease-resistant performer for me here in Zone 6b of Central South Pennsylvania over the years. I have four of these beauties planted in a row. They just love to try to take over my walkway that runs parallel to them. Though they were alleged to be small ever-blooming shrubs, these clusters of abundant pink easily grow 3 – 4 ft high and about 2 – 3 ft wide if I let them. Oh, I don’t mind their eager growth though for they sweetly greet me every time I drift to and fro.

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Sweet Drift in all her shades of pink say farewell. {Sept 2016}

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